Colligative Properties Feat. Colloids

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Colligative properties couldn’t be more mind-blown than they already are right now. Why do they have to come up with complicated and confusing terms, such as, volatile and nonvolatile? Why couldn’t some scientist say “vapor pressure and without vapor pressure”? They just want to make us kids in college more confused than we already are.

I always thought that osmosis went from higher concentration to lower concentration, which is partially true but I always thought it was higher solute concentration to lower solute concentration. But, that is false. I was wrong. If I would have known this I would have not got that wrong on all my biology and chemistry exams since high school. Good thing I know now before this exam! So the real definition of osmosis is, “the net movement of solvent is always toward the solution with the higher solute concentration”. So, in easier terms, it is the movement of water to the solution side across a semipermeable membrane to basically balance out the solute and the solvent. Your blood cells operate by osmosis. For instance, your red blood cells take in water or if there is too much salt intake in your body, the water escapes your blood cells and flows outside to try to dilute the solute. This isn’t good for your red blood cells, obviously, because they start to shrivel up due to lack of water. This is why doctors try to tell people to not eat so much salt in a day to prevent this from happening.  

Colloids form a dividing line between solutions and heterogeneous mixtures. They can be in the form of solids, liquids, or gases. Why can’t they just be called a form of solid, liquid, or a gas? Who knows….However, the Tyndall effect sounds pretty cool. It is known as the scattering of light by colloidal particles. So, basically, that is the reason why you are able to see a light from your car shine through a dirt road.

Thanks for reading, until next time.

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